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Gents.

This is my first Ducati, and I was going to set up the suspension to better suit my currently but dropping 96kg (210lbs) body.

I just went through setting up the ergonomics of the clutch/brake to suit me, the shifter and brake seems ok in stock position.

Then it's the Öhlins suspension.
I find the forks very hard, and the rear shock very soft.
Oddly enough there appears to be no static SAG in the rear, maybe 2mm or something, the front has very little (5mm?), but I think I need some help to measure. The lack of static sag appears to be "a thing" with the Diavel after searching the vast inter webs.

Then the manual completely fails in basic settings.
Suspension range of travel is unknown (120mm, 130mm????)
Rider SAG is unknown (25-35mm???)
There are some "out of the box settings", but no mention if this is for the "universal" 75kg rider or some other weight. At least it's not "fully out" as on most other bikes.

I kind of feel I lack the basic information to get this set up correct.
Well, "it's a cruiser not a sports bike" you may say, and well that is true, I'm sure the suspension setup is not as important as on a super sport or super naked, but it will improve cornering and flicking the bike when correct, but still, very little information in the manual.

I set up the compression/rebound on the shock as stock, but added two clicks of compression dampening to slow it down a little more.
Preload, well, I did not get any C-spanners with the bike, Dealer said they did not come with the bike, sounds weird, I have always had those come with the bike in the past.
So not able to adjust rear SAG, seems to be very far out though, so very little preload applied.

The fronts are very stiff, may be because this is a fairly heavy bike.
Set the compression and rebound to standard settings and put a zip tie around one of the fork to see how much travel I use, sadly, this looses some of its purpose when you don't know the total travel of the fork, you have no idea how far above the lower fork casting the bottom out is.

I'll have the Dealer set up my SAG during first service and I guess I'll just have to tinker with compression and rebound to find something that works as the season progresses.

Might send Öhlins a mail and see if they have some more information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well, I'll update myself


Sent a mail to Öhlins last night and they responded this morning, that's great service.

Not the answer I wanted, but I got some useful information.

" The Diavel 1260s is an Öhlins OEM product range, they are set up for an 80kg rider (176lbs).
Technical spec and data has not yet been released by Öhlins, this is usually due to an agreement between the fabricator (Ducati) and Öhlins that the spec is the fabricators property for a certain time after the product has been released.
We therefore have no technical data on this system."

Well, at least I got to know the rider weight of 80kg, which means my 96kg will need a lot of preload, or possibly a stiffer spring.

But there is more.

"If we look at aftermarket products for the 2018 Diavel, the forks have a work area of 120mm, springs are 10N/mm and reccomended pre-tension is 8mm, the fork has a top out spring of 68mm, meaning the exact top out point is hard to tell without putting the fork in a bench and pull on it.
Recommended oil height is 120mm, and compression setting 12 clicks, rebound 12 clicks.
Recommended static SAG is 18mm and Rider SAG 27mm.
The rear shock has a 58mm work area, a 24,5 mm top out spring and a main spring of 80N/mm, pretensioned by 25mm.
With a 95kg (210lbs) rider, you should consider changing to a stiffer spring.
Recommended Static SAG is 8mm and rider sag 32mm.
To measure SAG, the shocks must be stretched by lifting the bike and pushing down on the wheels, this to compensate for the top out springs"


Well the 2018 Diavel is a little different to the 2019/20, especially the rear shock, but I guess there is some information to take out of this.

80kg rider.

Fork work area is probably 120mm, measured mine to 115mm on the side stand +18mm static SAG = 133mm, placing bottom out 13mm above the lower casting, in the area I expected it to be.

Shock work area is 58mm, measured mine to 70mm, but it will obviously bottom out before that, so I can absolutely see 58mm being correct. looking at the numbers on my spring though, it appears to be 75N/mm, not 80N/mm, and mine is pretensioned to 23mm not 25mm. looks like my bike has very little preload applied to the rear, if any.

SAG numbers should be the same, so I guess if you measure the bike on the ground, static sag applied you may say, front SAG should be (27-18=9mm) and rear 32-8=24mm), 9mm and 24mm is actually very close to my old bikes SAG numbers.
 

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Great info Noggie, thanks for that. I'm 95 kg so about the same as you, have had the 1260 for about a year now. Been feeling that it's a little slow to turn, and requires constant input to maintain a lean in the turn.

Over the weekend I measured rider sag with the help of a friend and it measured 45mm, way too much. Wound in enough preload to bring it to 35mm and the bike now rides much better. Only problem is that there is absolutely zero static sag now, which to me is indicative of the need for a heavier spring.

Spoke to my local ducati dealer about ordering a heavier spring and was told they are not able to order it. Any ideas how I can get my hands on the product code for a heavier spring?
 

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Great info Noggie, thanks for that. I'm 95 kg so about the same as you, have had the 1260 for about a year now. Been feeling that it's a little slow to turn, and requires constant input to maintain a lean in the turn.

Over the weekend I measured rider sag with the help of a friend and it measured 45mm, way too much. Wound in enough preload to bring it to 35mm and the bike now rides much better. Only problem is that there is absolutely zero static sag now, which to me is indicative of the need for a heavier spring.

Spoke to my local ducati dealer about ordering a heavier spring and was told they are not able to order it. Any ideas how I can get my hands on the product code for a heavier spring?
Do you have the 1260 or the 1260s with the Öhlins shock?

If you have the Öhlins system you may not have any static sag, I dont have that on my bike.
I managed to get the spring tightened during the first service, I also reduced the compression dampening by 4 clicks to make it softer, same on the forks.
The bike rides great, but I find it is sometimes a little harsh on motorways, seems the fast compression is a little too stiff, I may go a click or two softer on the compression dampening.

If the spring is too soft, you need to reduce the compression dampening to get a smooth ride. if not the shock will take up the energy the spring is not, hence you need more flow or the shock will hydrolock becoming stiff.

my current setup is.
Shock:
Preload: 22mm (Range 19-29mm)
Compression: 16 clicks counter clockwise (range 20 clicks) default 12 clicks ccw
Rebound: 14 clicks ccw (range 30 clicks) default 12 clicks

Forks:
Preload: 6 turns clockwise (range 0-10 turns) default 4 turns
Compression: 20 clicks ccw (range 30 clicks) default 17 clicks ccw
Rebound: 14 clicks default 12 clicks ccw

I haven't checked my SAG, but this is quite comfortable to ride with, I'm currently 98kg.

I also checked my tire pressure with was a little on the high side for the rear tire (2,75bar) so I lowered that to the recommended 2,5bar and that also helped me become a bit more comfortable with the bike as well.

The Spring on the Öhlins is a 01106-75-120 L4019 that is a 75nm spring that is 120mm long the rest is Öhlins numbers.
getting a 01106-85-120 should be what you need.
 

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Do you have the 1260 or the 1260s with the Öhlins shock?

If you have the Öhlins system you may not have any static sag, I dont have that on my bike.
I managed to get the spring tightened during the first service, I also reduced the compression dampening by 4 clicks to make it softer, same on the forks.
The bike rides great, but I find it is sometimes a little harsh on motorways, seems the fast compression is a little too stiff, I may go a click or two softer on the compression dampening.

If the spring is too soft, you need to reduce the compression dampening to get a smooth ride. if not the shock will take up the energy the spring is not, hence you need more flow or the shock will hydrolock becoming stiff.

my current setup is.
Shock:
Preload: 22mm (Range 19-29mm)
Compression: 16 clicks counter clockwise (range 20 clicks) default 12 clicks ccw
Rebound: 14 clicks ccw (range 30 clicks) default 12 clicks

Forks:
Preload: 6 turns clockwise (range 0-10 turns) default 4 turns
Compression: 20 clicks ccw (range 30 clicks) default 17 clicks ccw
Rebound: 14 clicks default 12 clicks ccw

I haven't checked my SAG, but this is quite comfortable to ride with, I'm currently 98kg.

I also checked my tire pressure with was a little on the high side for the rear tire (2,75bar) so I lowered that to the recommended 2,5bar and that also helped me become a bit more comfortable with the bike as well.

The Spring on the Öhlins is a 01106-75-120 L4019 that is a 75nm spring that is 120mm long the rest is Öhlins numbers.
getting a 01106-85-120 should be what you need.
I have the 1260s with the Öhlins rear shock. Have been told by a mechanic not to expect any static sag on our bikes, he briefly spoke about the design of the subframe and suspension but didn't elaborate. This isn't the first time I've heard of this so I will try riding and evaluating my current settings.

I can't seem to find the part number that you've provided, is this something I will have to email Öhlins directly to order?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have the 1260s with the Öhlins rear shock. Have been told by a mechanic not to expect any static sag on our bikes, he briefly spoke about the design of the subframe and suspension but didn't elaborate. This isn't the first time I've heard of this so I will try riding and evaluating my current settings.

I can't seem to find the part number that you've provided, is this something I will have to email Öhlins directly to order?
Sorry, I was out of town this weekend and haven't checked the forum.

No SAG is down to the top out spring I guess, if you read the quote from Öhlins in my first post.
Essentially it's a spring that loads the main spring. Meaning, in order to get static sag, you need to fully compress the top out spring.
To be able to do that, you basically need to lift the bike off the ground and push the rear tire/swingarm down as far as it goes.

You would need to get that spring from Öhlins, not Ducati, numbers should help, but not sure they have them yet, politics, also mentioned in my first post.
 

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The Spring on the Öhlins is a 01106-75-120 L4019 that is a 75nm spring that is 120mm long the rest is Öhlins numbers.
getting a 01106-85-120 should be what you need.
Sorry for reviving an old post, but has anyone been able to replace the spring? When I went in for my first service and had the suspension setup to me, they said that I needed a stiffer spring because I was bottoming out. And looking at the spring I can see its hitting / rubbing. My local dealership has been trying to get an answer from Ohlins for over a week now.
 

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Do you have the 1260 or the 1260s with the Öhlins shock?

If you have the Öhlins system you may not have any static sag, I dont have that on my bike.
I managed to get the spring tightened during the first service, I also reduced the compression dampening by 4 clicks to make it softer, same on the forks.
The bike rides great, but I find it is sometimes a little harsh on motorways, seems the fast compression is a little too stiff, I may go a click or two softer on the compression dampening.

If the spring is too soft, you need to reduce the compression dampening to get a smooth ride. if not the shock will take up the energy the spring is not, hence you need more flow or the shock will hydrolock becoming stiff.

my current setup is.
Shock:
Preload: 22mm (Range 19-29mm)
Compression: 16 clicks counter clockwise (range 20 clicks) default 12 clicks ccw
Rebound: 14 clicks ccw (range 30 clicks) default 12 clicks

Forks:
Preload: 6 turns clockwise (range 0-10 turns) default 4 turns
Compression: 20 clicks ccw (range 30 clicks) default 17 clicks ccw
Rebound: 14 clicks default 12 clicks ccw

I haven't checked my SAG, but this is quite comfortable to ride with, I'm currently 98kg.

I also checked my tire pressure with was a little on the high side for the rear tire (2,75bar) so I lowered that to the recommended 2,5bar and that also helped me become a bit more comfortable with the bike as well.

The Spring on the Öhlins is a 01106-75-120 L4019 that is a 75nm spring that is 120mm long the rest is Öhlins numbers.
getting a 01106-85-120 should be what you need.
This is much later than the discussion - but HOW do you adjust the spring pre-load? A C spanner isn't able to fit in the space to be able to turn the adjuster rings. Any help appreciated - even my Ducati shop couldn't figure out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thought I'd bring this thread up again since I appear to have found a very good setting for those in the 100kg/220lbs weight class.

I rode with above mentioned setting last season, but I was never really happy with it, it was just too harsh and not very comfortable especially on the motorways and my confidence level was not great.

You may remember my spring length thread from a few weeks back, I read a bit more on the Ducati recommended setting, and I looked at my tires to see how they had worn in the 3200km/2000mi I had ridden the bike so far.
The front tire showed signs of too slow rebound, the rear was not too bad.

What I did:
Tires, the manual tells you that the standard pressure is 2,5bar/36psi front rear, but that can be increased to 2,6/37 front and 2,9/42 rear with passenger/load.
I opted to go 2,6/37 front and rear, as a too inflated tire will not be good either, but a little extra pressure for the extra 20kg/44lbs while keeping a comfortable flex in the tires.

Rear Shock:
I turned the preload up to the full 24mm, +5mm from the stock 19mm.
Compression 10 clicks ccw
Rebound 14 clicks ccw

The compression is two clicks less than stock, or slower/harder due to the extra weight.
The rebound is two clicks more than stock, or faster, again due to the extra weight, this needs to be faster to raise the rear after the compression.

Front forks:
Preload 8 turns cw, 4 turns more than stock.
Compression 15 clicks ccw
Rebound 16 clicks ccw

The same is applied here, slower compression by 2 clicks, faster rebound. by 2 clicks.

I now have a very smooth bike that soak up the imperfections in the road, not quite the "magic carpet ride", but the bike is not as harsh as before and my confidence in corners is much improved, riding over speed bumps is not bad either.

I will keep these settings and monitor my tires too see how they wear in the next 2-3000km/1500-2000mi, I may have to go with a stiffer rear spring, but since I don't require a high performance level from this bike, I may get away with the stock spring.
 

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Great job. I'm 72kg and still find the ride very harsh indeed but still can't find settings to suit. Any advice from your analysis?
 

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Great job. I'm 72kg and still find the ride very harsh indeed but still can't find settings to suit. Any advice from your analysis?
I think I would start by verifying the stock settings, after all they are typically set up for a 75kg rider + gear.

Tires:
keep the 2,5bar front rear setting

Forks:
4 turns of preload
Compression 17 clicks ccw
rebound: 12 clicks ccw

Shock:
Preload 19mm spring compression
Compression 12 ccw
Rebound 12 ccw

You being just slightly lighter than the "universal standard" I think you should keep the preload at stock recommended value.

I would start with the rear shock first, get that "right", then look at the front.

19mm preload on the 168mm spring is a spring length of 149mm.

You being slightly lighter means less compression damping is needed.

I would try:
Compression at 14 clicks ccw, should make it softer, you may want to go 16 click just to try.
Rebound at 10 clicks, you probably need slower rebound as there is less weight to lift after each compression.

Ignore the front for now and try going over speed bumps, elevated pedestrian crossings or similar large bumps where you have two distinct compressions. Focus on how the rear behaves, if you feel the rear is "kicking you up out of the seat" the rebound is too fast, if you feel it hard with little of no compression of the shock, you need to reduce the compression damping.
Try compression at 14 and rebound at 10 and increase compression if required.

On the forks, get a zip tie and put it on one fork leg, this will show you how much you are compressing the forks.
Go brake hard 2-3 times and see where the zip tie is on the shock, if you are at 50% its way too hard. if you are about 3cm from the lower shock casting, you are good.

Once you got the rear closer to where you want it, apply similar number of clicks to the front.
or you can start with:

Compression: 19 clicks ccw
Rebound: 10 clicks ccw.

If you are struggling to get the forks to compress much past the 50% point when breaking hard, you could try to take out 2 turns of fork preload as well.

Start with this and let me know how it works out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Brilliant, thanks for that, i'll have a go at the weekend and report back!
Forgot to mention it.
When you check where you currently are, make a record so that you can go back to that.
Just go clockwise to the end and count the clicks.
Then go counter clockwise to the default setting, add two for compression and subtract two for rebound.
Then we'll go from there.
 

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Thought I'd bring this thread up again since I appear to have found a very good setting for those in the 100kg/220lbs weight class.
Thank you for the detailed info, I am close to that same weight right now, at least without gear on. Once I throw on a leather jacket and the rest of the gear I am closer to 240 lbs. Rear of the bike is bottoming out, and you can see the yellow coating coming off. I ended up ordering a heavier spring, which Ohlins told the dealership that for my weight I needed 01106-125-120. Going into the dealer May 26 to have it installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for the detailed info, I am close to that same weight right now, at least without gear on. Once I throw on a leather jacket and the rest of the gear I am closer to 240 lbs. Rear of the bike is bottoming out, and you can see the yellow coating coming off. I ended up ordering a heavier spring, which Ohlins told the dealership that for my weight I needed 01106-125-120. Going into the dealer May 26 to have it installed.
Interesting. I guess I'm 230lbs with gear and I have not bottomed out my shock, I see the little black foam thing on the rod is a fair distance from bottom.
Though I guess it depends on how you ride.
I haven't been pushing the bike that hard yet as I was not comfortable, that might change now.
I see my fork zip-tie is a bit too low, maybe 10mm from bottom out.

Right now the setup I have is good for cruising, but I doubt it will hold up for canyons or track use going flat out, but it should work out for those that use the bike for cruising.

I know I'm quite a bit too heavy for the factory suspension, but I thought I'd see if I could make it work, I may need to order a set of springs in a month or so.

You could try my compression/rebound settings before you get the new spring just to report back what you think of it, might be helpful for others.
 

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Forgot to mention it.
When you check where you currently are, make a record so that you can go back to that.
Just go clockwise to the end and count the clicks.
Then go counter clockwise to the default setting, add two for compression and subtract two for rebound.
Then we'll go from there.
This sounds really silly but, with reference to the rear rebound specifically, when we talk about clockwise are we looking down the shock towards the rear tyre or up the shock away from the rear tyre?

Only reason I mention it is if i turn it fully clockwise from looking down the shock, I would expect it to stop at fully closed but it doesn't, it just stops clicking and rotates. This makes me think this is the fully open position!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
This sounds really silly but, with reference to the rear rebound specifically, when we talk about clockwise are we looking down the shock towards the rear tyre or up the shock away from the rear tyre?

Only reason I mention it is if i turn it fully clockwise from looking down the shock, I would expect it to stop at fully closed but it doesn't, it just stops clicking and rotates. This makes me think this is the fully open position!
Definitely a valid question.

I viewed from the rear and turned clockwise until it stopped, I guess that would be rotating the wheel up towards the seat to go clockwise.
So it would be "up the shock away from the rear tyre" as you describe it.

You can verify this by looking at the shock performance.
Fully clockwise should make the shock very slow, fully counter clockwise should make the shock bounce back up significantly faster.
 

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Definitely a valid question.

I viewed from the rear and turned clockwise until it stopped, I guess that would be rotating the wheel up towards the seat to go clockwise.
So it would be "up the shock away from the rear tyre" as you describe it.

You can verify this by looking at the shock performance.
Fully clockwise should make the shock very slow, fully counter clockwise should make the shock bounce back up significantly faster.
Thank you - your help and advice is invaluable. Now I have to wait for the incessant rain to stop!!
 

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Interesting. I guess I'm 230lbs with gear and I have not bottomed out my shock, I see the little black foam thing on the rod is a fair distance from bottom.
Though I guess it depends on how you ride.
I haven't been pushing the bike that hard yet as I was not comfortable, that might change now.
I see my fork zip-tie is a bit too low, maybe 10mm from bottom out.

Right now the setup I have is good for cruising, but I doubt it will hold up for canyons or track use going flat out, but it should work out for those that use the bike for cruising.

I know I'm quite a bit too heavy for the factory suspension, but I thought I'd see if I could make it work, I may need to order a set of springs in a month or so.

You could try my compression/rebound settings before you get the new spring just to report back what you think of it, might be helpful for others.
I didnt notice it bottoming out myself when I first got it a couple months ago. It only had 466 miles on it when I bought it, so it didnt take me long to need the first service. When I took it in for the service, I had them do the suspension setup for my weight and they saw it was bottoming out. Looking at it I can see where the bottom of the seat is rubbing on the spring. Not sure if I have the time, but if I do I will try out your settings before taking it in.

One thing I did change, it said to have the tires at 36.2 psi from what I read, I just changed it to 36.5, and maybe it is my imagination, but it feels more nimble, going side to side feels much easier. I didnt expect 0.3 psi to feel that different to me. My last bike was a 720 lb cruiser, and going up or down 1 psi didnt have as much of a change in handling as this 0.3 psi feels like to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I didnt notice it bottoming out myself when I first got it a couple months ago. It only had 466 miles on it when I bought it, so it didnt take me long to need the first service. When I took it in for the service, I had them do the suspension setup for my weight and they saw it was bottoming out. Looking at it I can see where the bottom of the seat is rubbing on the spring. Not sure if I have the time, but if I do I will try out your settings before taking it in.

One thing I did change, it said to have the tires at 36.2 psi from what I read, I just changed it to 36.5, and maybe it is my imagination, but it feels more nimble, going side to side feels much easier. I didnt expect 0.3 psi to feel that different to me. My last bike was a 720 lb cruiser, and going up or down 1 psi didnt have as much of a change in handling as this 0.3 psi feels like to me.
I'll have a close look at my shock, haven't seen any obvious signs or felt it bottom out.

Increased pressure will make the a motorcycle tire, especially performance tires "rounder" and harder, this is why you feel its nimbler, at the same time the harder tire will soak up less imperfections in the road, a more inflated tire can give you more road surface feedback. Overinflated will make you loose grip.
I guess your old bike had a more square profile tire than the Diavel.

0,3 psi shouldn't really be noticeable, typically a tire pressure will increase by 2-3 psi from cold to working temperature, 3-4psi if ridden hard.

I set my pressure in my garage at 20C/68F to 38psi a few weeks ago, outside its just over 10C/50F and the roads are cold, so the tires dont heat up as much now, (spring has been unusually cold this year) in 2-3 weeks I will probably need to let out 2 psi to get down to 38psi as the ambient temperature and roads are much much warmer, then in september I need to bring it up again.
Another thing to notice is that most pressure gauges differ, so either get your own gauge or check pressure at the same place every time.
You can check your pressure at a service station, then cross the road to the next one and have several psi difference.
I have my own gauge and air compressor in my garage.
 
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