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2012
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody revive their rides after storing for a few years?

Appreciate any inputs on what to look out for on the diavel - service, shocks etc
(as of now, going to do basics myself like lubing chain, adjusting chain, replacing battery)

Some context:
I unfortunately had some undiagnosed condition with both my hands and had stopped riding to see if it goes away about 2018. Before that I had reduced riding from 2016 to about about 200 miles a year.
Still see pain in my both my hands (deep within the muscles between the thumb and the index finger) but giving this a shot since stopping riding didn’t get rid of the pain anyway (rest + multiple physical therapies and pain killers only killed prior strength).

Now, trying to revive my ride, rehab my hands myself by strength exercises and get back to riding.
So any inputs on ergo and riding style also greatly appreciated since its either this last shot or I give up riding forever.

Current state:
—> Its a gen 1 carbon
—> I remember it was showing some pressure sensor error back then.
—> I am replacing the battery with a LiFePo4 antigravity one.
—> The OEM Yuasa has always been terrible for me since I had replaced it twice in super short intervals - due to excessive drain + infrequent rides.
—> Fairly remember the headlight bulb was replaced but could have gone out again.
—> Suspension seems pretty stiff especially the front and even before I always felt it wasn’t adjusted to my ergo
—> tires are filled with air and I moved the bike around in the garage couple days ago so the tires lose any unevenness and hopefully not risky to ride

I have a dealer who can service a few miles away but debating if I should just go to another place.

Thanks a lot for your help to a fellow rider.
 

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If the bike has been sitting since 2018 I'd replace the belts to be on the safe side, especially if the engine hasn't run in this time (belts will have sat in one position all this time). Personally not on board with the lithium battery thing so I'll leave that alone :) (I've always had a great run with Japanese Yuasa, but like all Ducati's they do need to be kept on a battery tender to get the best life/performance).
I can highly recommend the Andreani fork cartridges if you want to improve the standard set up ( recently had mine done along with a Nitron rear shock, made a noticeable difference!).
With the tyres, you'll feel it straight away if there's any flat spotting from sitting, it might be an idea to check the manufacture date on the tyres given it's sat for the best part of 4 years - industry standard to replace is between 5-6 years unless they've been kept in temperature controlled storage. Regardless, I'd examine them for any signs of deterioration such as cracking.
I would also change the fluids (oil, coolant, brake etc.).
That's what I'd do along with what you have listed, other people may have differing opinions. 😎
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your inputs. I was also not a fan of replacing with the LiFePo4 but with/without security system, the drain was unbelievable. If I didn’t ride even for a week and didn’t have it on battery tender like an electric car, the battery would be dead and not revivable. I was told there were bad batches of the Yuasa battery at the time. Now, instead of taking a chance 2nd time with the heavy and possibly bad battery, I chose the antigravity. Yet to see the outcome but I believe it will be much much better - especially the weight and thereby handling while connecting the terminals, the abs cable doesn’t get squished. Also, the belts you mentioned were specific to Engine right? Because I know the later models may have a belt instead of the chain as well. Also I would think these sit at the dealers for quite some time, so not sure if the belts deteriorate that way. Hoping to have some more inputs on different aspects from others as well while I figure this journey of revival 😅
 

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Hi there, yes I was referring to the cam belts these need to be replaced at 24,000km's/15,000 miles or 60 months whichever comes first. If the bike has just sat without being run, and depending on storage conditions the belts may take a 'set' to the position they have sat in or possibly even rusted/stuck to the pulleys which may cause damage on startup. remember, as opposed to sitting 'relaxed' on a shelf at a dealers the belts once fitted are under tension and the pulleys are quite small in circumference. At the very least I would turn the engine over by hand or by revolving the back wheel whilst in gear before actually firing it up and inspect the condition of the belts.
These are of course worst case scenario's but as you are probably aware if you break a belt it can cause very expensive damage to the engine as it's an interference type engine.
 

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I forgot to ask, what are you trying to achieve regarding ergonomics?
Biggest complaint I've seen on here is with stock handlebars, some guys have fitted Strada bars with varying success. Mine came with some Aella bars though I don't know the model but they seem to be a bit closer to the rider than stock without as much pullback.
If you want the what are possibly the best option and don't mind paying then take a look at the Aella Variable Handlebars:
Though even with these some people are less than happy, I guess everyone is different and we're all different shapes and sizes which confuses the issue!
 

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Nice bike :). Not sure how comfortable you are doing your own work, but after 5 years of sitting I'd put in some fresh fuel and injector cleaner, a new battery, fresh oil and filter, and see if you can get it started ok. If so great, if not you might be in for a hassle with a gummed up fuel system. Assuming you can get it running easily then...

  • quick inspection of all lights, look for leaks, check torque on the major fasteners (axle pinch bolts, etc.)
  • pressure sensor error is for the sensor that plugs into the left side air intake. I'd bet at some point the air filter was looked at and the sensor wasn't plugged back in, so first step is to make sure it's connected. If it was plugged in then replace it. Cheap and easy.
  • if it was me I wouldn't ride far on those old tires, I'd be riding straight to the shop to have them replaced.
  • timing belts will be due for replacement based on the time interval. Failure is a low likelihood but high consequences type of event, I'd plan to have the belts done.
  • inspect and lube/tension the chain.
  • flush/bleed brakes and clutch.

These will give you a safe to ride bike, but you'll want to catch up on overdue maintenance as well. Coolant flush, fork oil change, other stuff on the service schedule depending on how picky you are with it. Front fork is over sprung from new, you can't tune out the stiffness. Setup wise you can back off the preload completely as well as back out the compression damping fully. And it will still be stiff, only real fix is to replace the springs/cartridge with something like an Andreani cartridge kit.

Ergonomically you can go with something like a diavel strada handlebar that will be pulled back and up a few more inches, but you'll most likely have to switch throttle cables and maybe even brake/clutch lines to longer ones. I'd try adjusting/angling the existing handlebar up just a little bit to see if that helps. Otherwise you could try to focus on supporting your weight through the footpegs and your core muscles rather than your wrists.

Cheers
 
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