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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I saw a K&N air intake, DU-1007, for $40 and figured I would try it out. It's cold and icy here this time of year, so changing parts is the only bike time I get at the moment. I checked here and only found a few basic instructions, so I figured I would make a more detailed step by step for anyone interested. This is a pretty easy process. And my bike is dirty. I'll get to that later.

At a high level, the process is:
1. Remove the intake grill
2. Remove the intake cover
3. Remove the plastic intake box
4. Possible step - repeat for other side of bike
5. Replace filter
6. Reassemble

Tools required:
1. 2.5mm, 3.0mm, and 4.0mm allen wrench
2. 10mm racheting wrench
3. Long 4.0mm allen wrench or a lot of creativity
4. Thread locker



I show the left side of the bike because I had pulled apart the right side before getting the camera out. The right side is very slightly easier if you're just going to be removing one side. I removed both, so it wasn't important.

First, I chose to remove the 4mm fastener on the side of the intake cover. You can do this after you remove the grill if you prefer.



Next, I removed the four fasteners at the intake grill, circled below. The grill fasteners are 2.5mm, and the other two are 3mm. The 3mm fasteners appear to have thread locker on them, so when I reassembled I added a dab of loctite to them.



The grill can now be removed.



Next, loosen the 10mm head bolt, shown below. This does not need to be removed. It will loosen and detach from the air intake cover well before it comes out. When you suspect the intake cover is free, give it a slight tug and you'll see.



This one is too tight for a rachet head, but a racheting wrench fits fine, or monkey wrench works if that's all you have laying around.



Notice that on the right side, this isn't a tight fit - the hose is only on the left side of the bike.



Now that the bolt is free, once you've verified this by giving the cover a slight tug, you're ready to slide the intake cover forward. I didn't get a great shot of the sliding pieces, but here's what I have:



It's a little easier to see what's happening with the cover off. I didn't have enough light in the garage, so the nearby clip and hole pair is blurry, but the forward and rearward clip and hole pairs are identical.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Now you're ready to remove the air intake box and access the filter. The box is held in place by 3x 4.0mm fasteners. They're recessed rather deeply, so this is where you want a long 4mm allen wrench.



The hardest one to access is about 12-15mm recessed (4-5 inches).



Once the bolts are free, you can remove the intake box. Note that on the left side only, there is an electrical clip you have to detach.



To remove it, simply press down as shown and the clip can be detached. This one behaved well and only took a few seconds to remove.



Now a picture of the intake box. I thought the hole and what appears to be a resonance port were interesting.



You can see the port hole in the air intake box.



Now you have access to your air filter. To put everything back together just reverse the steps.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Finally, a few K&N filter assembly specific comments. At the beginning you can compare the two, and the construction appears very similar with two exceptions: the K&N filter has less folds, and it's red. The K&N race filter has still less folds, so I can only assume this results in the filter flowing more air (and dirt) than the stock filter.
The K&N filter is slightly less wide than the OEM filter. This is because, while the OEM filter has no edge seals, the K&N filter uses a pair of foam seals and instructs you to use a provided goop to seal the edges. Below are the two filters with only one of the two foam seals on the K&N filter. When you have both filters on, the intake needs to compress slightly to seal everything together.



That alone sounds great and looks like it will work well. The OEM filter had a small amount of dust was slipping in through one edge, so perhaps this is actually a little better. It's not something I would lose sleep over either way, but it's nice K&N is trying to make the filter work a little better. I just applied the goop to both sides of the foam and put it in place in the air filter box. Here's the air intake box shown without the K&N foam seal.



Unfortunately, the foam I received was a little too large in effective diameter for the OEM airbox, so it tends to bulge.



When installed, it bulges inward. Because of this, I had to take off both intake covers to get each seal in place, and when I did, I had foam sticking up where it shouldn't. I was able to push this foam back into place for the visible side, but I expect the other side has the same problem.



My recommendation is to use box cutters or something like that to trim the perimeter of the foam until it properly matches the airbox. I didn't do that, but maybe I will on another Saturday.
 

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Awesome, informative share!

But im too lazy to go thought all that!


BTW, did you feel there was any way the air intake could be modified to allow for more air flow?

Just wondering since i did that with my old bike.
 

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Appreciate the effort and detail, nice to get a closer look without having to pull the covers off myself.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, glad this is informative or useful! It was really a quick, easy job.

BTW, did you feel there was any way the air intake could be modified to allow for more air flow? Just wondering since i did that with my old bike.
As an induction noise junkie, I was thinking along those lines myself.

Because they went so far as to add a tuning port to the intake, I expect a "just cut this here and that there" approach would reduce performance without more understanding and forethought. For a guy like me to do it right would require some reading/learning. I'm an aerospace engineer that does mostly structures work and has a supplemental fluids background, so I have a very similar education to an ICE guy but none of that critical relevant practical experience. Reverse engineering the port design to understand it and doing basic engine characterization (things like air flow rates at target RPMs) would be a place to start.

Is anyone on the board reasonably knowledgeable on ICE induction systems?

And if not, we could always just go full *******, remap the bike super rich as a precaution, take all the parts off, jerry-rig two air filters onto the intake ports, then just see what happens. It would probably result in the loss of some midrange torque, a slight peak power gain, and a glorious loud sound...
 

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With my old bike (a Yamaha Fazer) a lot of people just chopped the airbox in half then mapped their power commanders. It worked very well. I get the feeling the Diavel is a little more complicated.

But if you do just chop it up, i think there are some pretty rich tune boy maps out there (Coops for one) that should compensate for any extra air coming in.
 

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Great description thanks for posting it. I've made the same only from the right side with a Pipercross filter, since then it runs really nice. The fit was better in my case just a little tight on the edges but fit was fine.

For me this is a must do.
 
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My understanding and what I've read with this design is; integrity of the air box is paramount no cutting or splicing.

Since there isn't a larger box design available, (which is a common performance upgrade for Ducati's) I'd suggest shorter or longer Air Funnel length, as it increases flow characteristics. Naturally, a freer flowing filter will help to increase CFM but tuning the Air Funnel length is required for better performance. Longer design should provide a higher rate of flow and velocity rate. I know with my previous Ducati's this was the key to better performance. You could actually tune power characteristics just by varying lengths of the Air Funnel

I don't believe cutting up a specifically designed Ducati air box would be the way to go, regardless of the tune. Ducati Intakes are straighter (more vertical) than any inline four, they need higher velocity and CFM to work properly. The box is designed to provide this. Not a fan of cutting up a Ducati Air box, sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I was looking into airbox modifications and found a few useful web reads for anyone interested. None of them are excellent sources i.e. texts or technical whitepapers from established authorities, but they make enough sense to be reasonable if you have a minute and are curious.

Overview of airboxes with some basic/approximate math at the end: http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Airboxes.html
Discussion on Ducati Superbike air intake systems, emphasis on filters: http://www.ducati-upnorth.com/tech/airfilter.php
Royal Enfield guy intake design experiments that align well with the above discussions: http://www.enfieldmotorcycles.com/forum/index.php?topic=4616.0

So I am left to scratch my head a bit and wonder how much induction noise could be increased without screwing up the resonance of the air intake system. No ideas/solutions so far, but knowing a bit more and having a better question is still something.
 

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i was planning to purchase the k&n washable air filter, problem was, one screw, which was the long 4.00mm allen wrench, is not budging out... any tips to get the thing off? i think they over tighten it and the the lock just follows. they say i have to use a soldering iron to get it out or loosen the screw? any tips? should i go ******* and just drill the thing out? haha. whewww...
 

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i was planning to purchase the k&n washable air filter, problem was, one screw, which was the long 4.00mm allen wrench, is not budging out... any tips to get the thing off? i think they over tighten it and the the lock just follows. they say i have to use a soldering iron to get it out or loosen the screw? any tips? should i go ******* and just drill the thing out? haha. whewww...
The soldering iron is a good idea. Essentially if you can apply heat to the screw it should come out pretty easy. I had something similar happen to me and I applied a small torch to the bolt for about 15 seconds and the bolt came right out.
 
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The soldering iron is a good idea. Essentially if you can apply heat to the screw it should come out pretty easy. I had something similar happen to me and I applied a small torch to the bolt for about 15 seconds and the bolt came right out.
did you remove the tank when tried it?
 
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