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How to Change Coolant

coolant change

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#1 ReidMcT

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:51 AM

Here's my procedure. I've copied a good deal from the manual, but have also annotated or changed some things to make up for incomplete, inconsistent, or nonsensical content in the manual. If you follow the manual to the letter, you won't be able to do the job.

That said, here goes... and sorry for lack of illustrations, which are referenced by numbers and letters in the following text.

Remove side fairings, front surround, unplug lower display, remove tank cover to expose coolant filler cap.
[Edit]: Vincent Vega reports that "it can be done by just removing the right side air intake. I just had to use a funnel with a tube attached to refill."

This operation must only be carried out when the engine is cold. Attempting to change the coolant with the engine hot could lead to burns from hot coolant or scalding steam.

Place a container under the engine and place the motorcycle on its side stand.

Remove the expansion reservoir filler cap (1).

Loosen clip (2), disconnect the hose (3) and drain the coolant inside a container.
[This is the overflow hose that attaches to the top of the filler neck, just below the cap. to drain it you must either reroute the hose, or use a pump or siphon to draw out the coolant.]

Loosen the cap (4) of the fluid exhaust hole placed on the pump cover.
[This is the drain plug on the side of the water pump]

Allow the coolant to drain off completely.
[I found that the most complete drain requires disconnecting one hose from the thermostat as well as the lower water pump hose - the one that feeds the horizontal cylinder.]

Screw plug (4) with a seal again in the fluid drain hole, and recover the new seal (5).
[This means put the drain plug and its washer back into the pump; they suggest installing a new washer, but I reused mine without trouble]

Tighten the plug (4) to a torque of 20 Nm (Min. 18 Nm - Max. 22 Nm) (Sect. 3 - 3, Engine torque settings).
[If changing coolant types, I suggest refilling the system with distilled water and running the engine briefly; then draining again.]

Refill the circuit by pouring new coolant into the circuit via the remote filler cap (6).

Connect the [overflow] pipe (3) by tightening the clamp (2) to a torque of 1 Nm ±10% (Sect. 3 - 3, Frame torque settings).

Allow several minutes for the coolant to fill all the internal passages.

Start up the engine and allow the coolant to reach 110 °C; run the engine for about 10 minutes.
[Plug in the lower display first.]

Stop the engine and allow it to cool down so that all the air is expelled from the cooling circuit.
[Note, they don't tell you to reinstall the filler cap. I think most people probably would, but I did not, and I would not in the future. Although it makes a heck of a mess when coolant starts belching and splashing out as the engine heats up, I found that a LOT of air came out and I ended up adding a great amount of coolant during this procedure. I do not see how simply capping the system, running the engine, and then letting it cool down, will possibly turn out right. Next time, I will lay a rag over the filler to reduce the splashing.]

Warning
Keep your hands, clothing and tools well clear of the radiator fan at all times; this fan starts automatically without warning and could cause serious injury or damage.

Important
Check the cooling circuit for possible leaks.

Top up the coolant through the expansion reservoir filler to bring the level up to the MAX. mark.
[Note, this is the first mention of refilling the reservoir; but if it weren't refilled before running the engine in the above steps, then there's no way the system would end up properly filled.]

Tighten the cap (1) of the expansion reservoir.

Edited by ReidMcT, 30 May 2013 - 12:42 PM.


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#2 DevilsAdvocate

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:56 AM

Thanks for the write-up!

#3 E350

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 03:05 PM

Reid, thank you. What coolant are you running now. I'm thinking of changing to motul as I hear good things about it.

#4 Long Johno

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 03:11 AM

Yep. Good stuff mate!

#5 ReidMcT

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:21 AM

View PostE350, on 26 November 2012 - 03:05 PM, said:

Reid, thank you. What coolant are you running now. I'm thinking of changing to motul as I hear good things about it.

Right now, I'm using Engine Ice (Propylene Glycol), but soon I will change to Toyota Super Long Life Coolant.

The Engine Ice was an experiment to see if it really helps the engine run cooler. It seems that it may do so, but the difference is not dramatic. And, since it does not seem to have a good anti-corrosion package, in consideration of recent Ducati remarks about corrosion problems in some Testastretta engines, I want to go to a long life coolant with excellent anti-corrosion.

#6 FLHtoFXDtoDUC

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:42 PM

What is wrong with the pink stuff Ducati is using now?

#7 ReidMcT

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:58 PM

View PostFLHtoFXD, on 27 November 2012 - 12:42 PM, said:

What is wrong with the pink stuff Ducati is using now?

Nothing is wrong with it (Agip) that I know of. It is, however, comparatively expensive as well as being very difficult to find in the USA outside a Ducati dealership.

#8 erwin-duc

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 07:15 PM

has anyone tried using ARAL ?
a ducati mechanic in Jakarta suggested i use ARAL, it is said that it is best used in hot climate..

#9 guvnorlee

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

View PostReidMcT, on 27 November 2012 - 11:21 AM, said:

Right now, I'm using Engine Ice (Propylene Glycol), but soon I will change to Toyota Super Long Life Coolant.

The Engine Ice was an experiment to see if it really helps the engine run cooler. It seems that it may do so, but the difference is not dramatic. And, since it does not seem to have a good anti-corrosion package, in consideration of recent Ducati remarks about corrosion problems in some Testastretta engines, I want to go to a long life coolant with excellent anti-corrosion.


Thanks for the write up mate... i have been thinking about changing the coolant on my bike although its only two days old. Was looking at running either the Redline water wetter or Motul Mocool coolant as they don't have glycol that has anti freeze properties as our weather is 25 to 37 deg all year round. How many liters does the bike consume?

View Posterwin-duc, on 19 December 2012 - 07:15 PM, said:

has anyone tried using ARAL ?
a ducati mechanic in Jakarta suggested i use ARAL, it is said that it is best used in hot climate..


A friend of mine runs that brand on his bike here and says its pretty good but I'm keen on trying the Redline, Motul or even the HKS supercool coolant used on the GTRs here though i don't know if that would be wise. Coolant is coolant right as in universal used for cars and bikes? pardon my blonde moment.

#10 DEVL-01

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 05:18 PM

I had my coolant changed (due to issues with Multi's) same time upgraded thermostat fitted, it seems coolant is not coolant for the Diavel and Multistradas

Edited by DEVL-01, 11 January 2013 - 05:19 PM.


#11 erwin-duc

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 11:04 PM

i think this thread should be pinned...

#12 ReidMcT

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 08:27 AM

View PostMischievous M, on 11 January 2013 - 12:57 PM, said:


Thanks for the write up mate... i have been thinking about changing the coolant on my bike although its only two days old. Was looking at running either the Redline water wetter or Motul Mocool coolant as they don't have glycol that has anti freeze properties as our weather is 25 to 37 deg all year round. How many liters does the bike consume?



A friend of mine runs that brand on his bike here and says its pretty good but I'm keen on trying the Redline, Motul or even the HKS supercool coolant used on the GTRs here though i don't know if that would be wise. Coolant is coolant right as in universal used for cars and bikes? pardon my blonde moment.


A little less than 2 liters comes out when you drain it. Stated capacity is 2.3 liters +/- 0.5 liters.

Coolant is NOT Coolant. There are great differences. Some coolants (with silicates) will damage parts your engine. Some (with inadequate anti-corrosion) will not protect it properly. The latter reason is why I am switching from Engine Ice to Toyota Super Long Life.

#13 TurboTiger

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 06:47 PM

Coolant is not coolant. There are many different kinds designed for different engines or materials in the engine. Redline water wetter is a particular poor coolant when it comes to it's anti corrosive abilities.

Also when switching coolants, you should drain and flush the coolant a few times with distilled water.

The Toyota Super Long Life coolant should be a good choice and should provide years of protection. I believe it's rated for 6 years?

#14 ScottMcFly

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 01:22 PM

I am considering replacing the coolant myself but I have a few questions. Thank you Reid for posting the procedure. But step one is a little daunting to me at first blush "Remove side fairings, front surround, unplug lower display, remove tank cover to expose coolant filler cap." Basically how hard is that to do? I change the oil and filter and adjust the chain, but I am a little frightened by step one.

Also what does this mean "Screw plug (4) with a seal again in the fluid drain hole, and recover the new seal (5)." What kind of seal? Do you get it at the dealer? Thanks for all your help.

Scott

#15 ReidMcT

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 02:21 PM

View PostScottMcFly, on 15 January 2013 - 01:22 PM, said:

I am considering replacing the coolant myself but I have a few questions. Thank you Reid for posting the procedure. But step one is a little daunting to me at first blush "Remove side fairings, front surround, unplug lower display, remove tank cover to expose coolant filler cap." Basically how hard is that to do? I change the oil and filter and adjust the chain, but I am a little frightened by step one.

Also what does this mean "Screw plug (4) with a seal again in the fluid drain hole, and recover the new seal (5)." What kind of seal? Do you get it at the dealer? Thanks for all your help.

Scott


Like most things, it seems scary and complex when you read the steps, but it is not super-hard to do. It does take patience to slowly, carefully remove (and not lose) all the screws. Basic hand tools are all that's needed. Search this forum for more detailed instructions on removing the side fairings. Once the screws are removed you have to slide the fairings sideways to release their tabs from the retaining slots.

Good question about the plug. I have annotated that step in my writeup above.

#16 VincentVega

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 01:48 PM

Hey Reid , gonna change the coolant this off season and was wondering how The Toyota Super Long Life Coolant is doing? Also did you just add it straight from the container or was any water added with it and how much does it take?

Edited by VincentVega, 26 January 2013 - 01:49 PM.


#17 ReidMcT

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 04:22 PM

View PostVincentVega, on 26 January 2013 - 01:48 PM, said:

Hey Reid , gonna change the coolant this off season and was wondering how The Toyota Super Long Life Coolant is doing? Also did you just add it straight from the container or was any water added with it and how much does it take?


I haven't changed it out yet. Been busy with work and not riding the last 6 weeks due to injury (not bike related). It's on my list to do before the end of February.

It is pre-mixed with pure (de-ionized?) water, so, no, you don't add water. Says so right on the jug in case you forget:
Posted Image

#18 VincentVega

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:44 AM

View PostReidMcT, on 26 January 2013 - 04:22 PM, said:


I haven't changed it out yet. Been busy with work and not riding the last 6 weeks due to injury (not bike related). It's on my list to do before the end of February.

It is pre-mixed with pure (de-ionized?) water, so, no, you don't add water. Says so right on the jug in case you forget:
Posted Image

Thanks Reid. And as far as you know this is good for our Ducati's?

#19 ReidMcT

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 07:28 AM

View PostVincentVega, on 27 January 2013 - 04:44 AM, said:

Thanks Reid. And as far as you know this is good for our Ducati's?

Yes, I am now confident that it is. The key is the color. Red/pink is a standard color for this type of coolant. Ducati is now recommending the pink stuff for some 1198 engines. (Red is concentrate and pink is pre-mixed)

Red/pink is made for aluminum engines and radiators and has a very good anti-corrosion package (that's what makes it super long life). It should not be used with copper or brass radiators. There are other brands that are just as good, but the Toyota stuff is widely available and not super expensive.

#20 Wafflefry

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:51 PM

Proper write up ReidMcT as always :scooter:





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